Can Students Have Too Much Tech?

tech-glut

Reposted from the New York Times:

More technology in the classroom has long been a policy-making panacea. But mounting evidence shows that showering students, especially those from struggling families, with networked devices will not shrink the class divide in education. If anything, it will widen it.

In the early 2000s, the Duke University economists Jacob Vigdor and Helen Ladd tracked the academic progress of nearly one million disadvantaged middle-school students against the dates they were given networked computers. The researchers assessed the students’ math and reading skills annually for five years, and recorded how they spent their time. The news was not good.

“Students who gain access to a home computer between the 5th and 8th grades tend to witness a persistent decline in reading and math scores,” the economists wrote, adding that license to surf the Internet was also linked to lower grades in younger children. In fact, the students’ academic scores dropped and remained depressed for as long as the researchers kept tabs on them. What’s worse, the weaker students (boys, African-Americans) were more adversely affected than the rest. When their computers arrived, their reading scores fell off a cliff.

The problem is the differential impact on children from poor families. Babies born to low-income parents spend at least 40 percent of their waking hours in front of a screen — more than twice the time spent by middle-class babies. They also get far less cuddling and bantering over family meals than do more privileged children. The give-and-take of these interactions is what predicts robust vocabularies and school success. Apps and videos don’t.

Read More…

A Survey of Third Grade Reading Policies Across the US

reading

Reposted from the Education Commission of the States:

The Education Commission of the States focuses on third-grade reading proficiency in a new report highlighting policies in all 50 states plus the District of Columbia. State policymakers are keenly aware of the importance of reading at grade level by third grade. Policymakers in many states have been advocating for policies aimed at three key levers:

  • Identifying reading deficiencies with state or local assessments.
  • Providing interventions for struggling readers in grades K-3.
  • Retaining outgoing third-graders not meeting grade-level expectations.

With the release of Third-grade reading policies, ECS captures current statutory provisions specifically for these three levers. This comprehensive look at third grade reading policies in all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will assist education policymakers and stakeholders as they look to continually improve early reading success for all students.

“Research clearly demonstrates the importance of reading at grade level by third grade and, unfortunately, we know that only one-third of our nation’s children are meeting this academic milestone,” said Bruce Atchison, ECS director of early learning. “Education policymakers are dedicated to ensuring their state’s students are reading at grade level by third grade. This new ECS report provides stakeholders with a complete view of policies addressing this universal education priority.”

Read More…

Read the full report here [PDF].

Is Free & Equitable “Public” Education a Myth?

diversity

Reposted from Salon:

The gap in the mathematical abilities of American kids, by income, is one of widest among the 65 countries participating in the Program for International Student Achievement. On their reading skills, children from high-income families score 110 points higher, on average, than those from poor families. This is about the same disparity that exists between average test scores in the United States as a whole and Tunisia. The achievement gap between poor kids and wealthy kids isn’t mainly about race. In fact, the racial achievement gap has been narrowing. It’s a reflection of the nation’s widening gulf between poor and wealthy families. And also about how schools in poor and rich communities are financed, and the nation’s increasing residential segregation by income.

As we segregate by income into different communities, schools in lower-income areas have fewer resources than ever. The result is widening disparities in funding per pupil, to the direct disadvantage of poor kids. The wealthiest highest-spending districts are now providing about twice as much funding per student as are the lowest-spending districts, according to a federal advisory commission report. In some states, such as California, the ratio is more than three to one. What are called a “public schools” in many of America’s wealthy communities aren’t really “public” at all. In effect, they’re private schools, whose tuition is hidden away in the purchase price of upscale homes there, and in the corresponding property taxes.

Rather than pay extra taxes that would go to poorer districts, many parents in upscale communities have quietly shifted their financial support to tax-deductible “parent’s foundations” designed to enhance their own schools. About 12 percent of the more than 14,000 school districts across America are funded in part by such foundations. They’re paying for everything from a new school auditorium (Bowie, Maryland) to a high-tech weather station and language-arts program (Newton, MA). “Parents’ foundations,” observed the Wall Street Journal, “are visible evidence of parents’ efforts to reconnect their money to their kids.” And not, it should have been noted, to kids in another community, who are likely to be poorer.

Read More…