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Using Gamification to Engage Your Audience [INFOGRAPHIC]

gamificationDid you know that 70% of Forbes’ Global 2000 have plans to use Gamification? Gamification has quickly become a super trend in marketing, customer engagement and employee retention. Demand Metric has created this new infographic to share what gamification is, how it works, facts, stats, benefits, and how to get started. View the original posting here.

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The Gamification of Education [INFOGRAPHIC]

ed_gamificationGamification (the use of game design elements in non-game contexts) has tremendous potential in the education space. Knewton asks, “ow can we use it to deliver truly meaningful experiences to students?” This infographic attempts to answer that question, using dates, facts and examples for your perusal.

View the original posting here.

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eLearning Trends to Follow in 2015 [INFOGRAPHIC]

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Online options are growing, and the classroom format is changing to incorporate the technology. There are a few trends on the cusp of explosive growth in the coming year, including flipped learning, mobilization, personalization and gamification. This infographic from TalentLMS projects the top 10 E-Learning Trends to Follow in 2015.

View the original post here.

23 of the Best Game-Based Education Resources

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Reposted from Edudemic:

Edudemic has covered game-based learning and gamification in the classroom on numerous occasions in the past. When learning becomes a game, it’s an enjoyable, effective experience for students and teachers alike. We’ve curated 23 of the best game-based education resources for 2014. If your class hasn’t gotten its game on yet, then now is the time.

The concept of game-based education is one that’s easily dismissed as being frivolous or time-wasting. These go-to resources will help teachers who would like to learn more about the effectiveness of using game-driven approaches in the classroom:

  • The Institute of Play explains how games nurture the higher-order thinking skills kids will need in their futures, including the ability to analyze and solve problems using media resources. The Why Games & Learning page on its site makes a particularly succinct and compelling argument on behalf of game-based learning. It describes games as “complex eco-systems extending beyond the game space to involve networks of people in a variety of roles and rich interactions.”

  • Educational technology company Knewton presents an easy-to-digest infographic about the prevalence of gaming in today’s society, the benefits of gaming in school, and how teachers can harness the powers of gaming for the good of public education.

  • In Gamification in the Classroom: The Right or Wrong Way to Motivate Students?, Tim Walker of the National Education Association (NEA) takes a look at today’s gamification trend, with a call-to-action for teachers to choose their methodology wisely. Although the article is rather critical of gamification in learning, it nonetheless offers valuable perspective to prevent educators from going too far with this method.

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Octalysis: A Framework for Thinking About Gamification [VIDEO 17:00]

“Imagine a world where labor is obsolete. Where work is something of the past…I’m talking about a world harnessing the power of play.” And so Yu-kai Chou begins this exploration of gamification. This 17 minute video provides the conceptual framework for gaming in education and beyond.

Read more about the 8 core drives of Chou’s Octalysis framework for gamification here.

Are Multiplayer Games the Future of Education?

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Reposted from the Atlantic:

“It was just supposed to be a quick trip to Beijing, a touristy group thing to take in the sights. It wasn’t supposed to go down like this. There wasn’t supposed to be a lost manuscript; the travelers weren’t supposed to turn on each other. The only good, if any, to be found in this godforsaken quest, this unholy mission, was that by the end of it, they would all know how to speak Mandarin.

This intricate Maltese Falcon­-like story will unfold each day, over the course of semester, as a multiplayer game at Renssalear Polytechnic Institute in New York. It is being  designed as a language-learning exercise by Lee Sheldon, an associate professor in the college’s Games and Simulations Arts and Sciences Program. “Using games and storytelling to teach­—it’s not that radical of a concept,” says Sheldon. “It makes them more interested in what’s going on.”

Sheldon is a pioneer in gamification, a new movement that essentially takes all the things that make video games engaging and applies them to classroom learning. Sheldon started developing the theory eight years ago. Since then, gamification now comes in all shapes and sizes and is used across educational levels, for kindergarteners through adult learners. Its practitioners range from individual teachers experimenting with game-like elements in their classrooms to entire schools that have integrated the games into their curricula.”

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