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Encouraging a Team Working Environment [INFOGRAPHIC]

teamwork

Here are 27 ways to put an end to the Red Pen mentality in education. What is Red Pen mentality? It is one of those people always walking around pointing out the flaws and never having a solution. Often in education, and in other team work environments, team members are quick to criticize. Team members either prefer their way or are insecure about their way. The easiest response is to point out the flaws of others, to gossip, or engage in other destructive behavior. This breaks down the team and destroys the cooperative environment. Mia MacMeekin offers this infographic on how to foster a positive team working environment.

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Microsoft’s “Classroom of the Future”

COTF

Reposted from the eBuyer Blog:

The last 20 years have arguably seen the biggest advances in education when it comes to technology in the classroom, with the introduction of computing and personal devices. As personal devices such as computers, laptops and tablets became cheaper, kids naturally became more familiar with the technology often surpassing the knowledge of their teachers or the curriculum.

Last week I was invited down to Microsoft’s “Classroom of the Future”, a concept space in central London where a team of technology and education experts display how modern tech and traditional teaching methods can be blended to create the most effective teaching environment. The modern open layout of the classroom is designed to replicate how any school could set out and embrace new styles of learning, with only minimal space and a range of funding.

So I suppose you’re asking what makes the classroom of the future so modern? Well it’s not quite as Jetsons-esque as one may predict, kids aren’t learning in self-contained education pods by robot lecturers….yet. The classroom of the future is driven by variation in learning. It’s not about simply copying text from a board anymore. Modern education, as the teachers out there will know, is about inclusivity, collaboration and getting kids actively involved.

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Isaac Asimov, Harbormasters & Charter Sectors

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Reposted from relinquishment:

Education Cities is an organization that supports New Schools for New Orleans type entities across the country. The describe their work as the following: “Our members serve as education “harbormasters” with deep ties to their communities. Like maritime harbormasters, who facilitate safe and cooperative navigation in a challenging space, education harbormasters build and coordinate the efforts to improve education in their city. Together, our members – nonprofits, foundations, and civic organizations – are improving opportunities for millions of children and their families.” Whether or not you like the phrase “harbormaster” – the goal is, I think, a sound one: supporting local organizations that can drive change based on local conditions.

Unfortunately, the charter sector does not have any psychohistorians amongst it ranks. As such, it’s difficult to predict how the next fifty years of high-quality charter school growth will (or will not) occur. This is why I view well run harbormasters to be of use. By fitting strategy to environment, they can come up with novel solutions to the most pressing local solutions – taking the best from what’s been tried nationally, but always with an eye toward local conditions. This is something that national foundations, national education organizations, and federal and state government entities will always struggle to do.

The goal of education reform should not be finding and adopting current best practices. The goal of education reform should be to build learning ecosystems that constantly evolve. Harbormasters can be a key part of these ecosystems.

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Teaching Conditions State-by-State

Reposted from WalletHub:1j

It’s no surprise that the high turnover rate within education has been likened to a revolving door. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, about a fifth of all newly minted public school teachers leave their positions before the end of their first year. And almost half never last more than five.

But besides inadequate compensation, other problems persist in the academic environment. Teachers, especially novices, move to other schools or abandon the profession “as the result of feeling overwhelmed, ineffective, and unsupported,” according to the ASCD. And without good teachers who are not only paid reasonably but also treated fairly, the quality of American education suffers.

In light of World Teachers Day on Oct. 5, WalletHub analyzed the 50 states and the District of Columbia to ease the process of finding the best teaching opportunities in the country. We did so by examining 18 key metrics, ranging from median starting salary to teacher job openings per capita. The results of our study, as well as additional insight from experts and a detailed methodology, can be found here.

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Why Is Innovation So Hard?

Office life

Reposted from Forbes:

“Our educational system and most work environments have taught us that good performance means avoiding failure, not making mistakes. This is a big problem, because failure is an unavoidable part of innovation experimentation. Innovation requires the willingness to fail and learn. Abraham Maslow, one of the founders of the humanistic psychology movement, aptly stated that an individual would engage in learning only “to the extent he is not crippled by fear and to the extent he feels safe enough to dare.”

This means that in order to innovate we need to change our attitude toward failures and mistakes. Contrary to what many of us have been taught, avoiding failure is not a sign that we’re smart. Being smart is not about knowing all the answers and performing flawlessly. Being smart is knowing what you don’t know, prioritizing what you need to know, and being very good at finding the best evidence-based answers. Being smart requires you to become comfortable saying, “I don’t know.”  It means that you do not identify yourself by your ideas but by whether you are an open-minded, good critical and innovative thinker and learner.

Creating a “big new” or a “big different” for your business requires innovative thinking, and innovative thinking requires the right kind of organizational environment. That is why innovation is so hard.”

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Video

NOT Old School!

Educators, students, and architects explore three new elementary schools designed by HMFH Architects for the Concord, NH School District, discussing 21st century learning environments that support collaborative project-based learning. Imagine the possibilities for learning in this uniquely designed environment!